Since March 2020, Airmic has been issuing Friday Reading, a curated series of readings and knowledge resources sent by email to Airmic members. The objective of Airmic Friday Reading was initially to keep members informed during the Covid-19 pandemic. Today, Airmic Friday Reading has evolved in scope to include content on a wide range of subjects with each email edition following a theme. This page is a searchable archive of all the readings and knowledge resources that have been shared.

To select multiple categories and/or keywords, use Ctrl+Click (or +Click on a Mac).
The Conversation, 19th August 2022
Friday Reading Edition 120 (26th August 2022)
Edward Sweeney, Professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Heriot-Watt University, calls for the supply chain industry to become stronger to ensure consumer demand is satisfied in an affordable and sustainable way, alongside the new issues that are arising as a result of industrial action.
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Marsh, 11th August 2022
Friday Reading Edition 121 (2nd September 2022)
More than six months into Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the conflict’s long-term impact is coming into focus. Now, much of the focus has shifted from specific developments in Ukraine and Russia to economic inflation globally and a fracturing of the geopolitical order.
Verisk Maplecroft , 4th August 2022
Friday Reading Edition 121 (2nd September 2022)
While the ongoing conflict in Ukraine has focused the attention of markets on the European Union’s dependence on Russian oil and gas, the war has also highlighted the scale of Europe’s reliance on its strategic rivals for critical minerals.
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Lloyd’s, 1st July 2022
Lloyd’s Futureset’s latest report, created in partnership with Aon, aims to provide insights on the medium to long term impacts of the Ukraine crisis on the risk landscape. The analysis is based on in-depth interviews with 75 sector experts and practitioners across Aon and Lloyd’s, each providing real-life, practical insights on the challenges that companies are facing today and how they are adjusting their risk management approaches in response.
MIT Sloan School of Management, 28th June 2022
The Russia-Ukraine war is having an outsized impact on the global supply chain, impeding the flow of goods, fueling dramatic cost increases and product shortages, and creating catastrophic food shortages around the world, according to experts at a virtual symposium hosted by the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics.
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Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO), 10th June 2022
Russia and Ukraine are among the most important producers of agricultural commodities in the world. Both countries are net exporters of agricultural products and are leading suppliers of foodstuffs and fertilisers to global markets, where exportable supplies are often concentrated in a handful of countries. The high concentrations could increase the vulnerability of these markets to shocks and volatility.
IHS Markit, 10th June 2022
The industrial growth outlook in Europe faces challenges from continued supply chain disruptions, exacerbated by the war's impact on transportation, prices, and availability of inputs .as well as weakening demand and higher risk aversion.
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Airmic,Control Risks,KPMG,Marsh,QBE,Sedgwick, 7th June 2022
Cyber threats are considered worse in 2022 than they were last year and the greatest risk for business. Geopolitical, climate and supply chain risks are tied at second place. Diseases and the pandemic have dropped out of the top 10 list of risks – but has this been de-escalated too quickly? Have we learnt and embedded the right lessons from Covid-19?
KPMG, 1st June 2022
KPMG expects GDP growth to more than halve this year to 3.2%, before slowing further to 0.7% in 2023. The cost of living crisis and the rising tax burden have led to a fall in consumer confidence which is set to drag on discretionary spending.
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Allianz, 1st June 2022
Businesses should prepare for a rise in civil unrest incidents as the cost-of-living crisis follows hard on the heels of the Covid pandemic. What can we learn from the protests we saw during the height of the pandemic and what role could social media play in intensifying future disruption?